Programme

In 13 sessions over three full days, we will discuss the value of working with nature to address societal challenges to ensure help ensure they support thriving human societies and ecosystems. We will consider the multiplicity of stakeholders that are involved and/or affected by nature-based solutions, including their diverse values, interests and rights, and and aim to establish a shared understanding across multiple sectors as to what constitutes a “legitimate” nature-based solution and how best to overcome barriers to their implementation. Sessions will be two hours long and highly interactive. They will bring together evidence from both science and practice, as well as perspectives from multiple disciplines and sectors on the practical, financial and governance challenges to scaling up nature-based solutions.

The conference will be in a hybrid format, where the conference will be held in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, which will include an immersive art and nature experience, with the majority of speakers attending in-person and some virtually. Participants can attend the conference in Oxford or online, as all sessions will be live streamed online with the opportunity for online participants to interact and ask questions. Throughout the event, there will be plenty of opportunities for networking, including at poster sessions during tea & coffee and lunch breaks. On the second night, there will be a dinner and drinks reception amongst the natural history collections.

Download the programme schedule.

Outline

Here is an outline of the programme. Confirmed speakers are given below this table. More details about individual sessions will be added over time.

Session Session title
Keynote 1

Opening remarks by Lord Goldsmith | UK Government and Inger Andersen | Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Director of the UN Environment Programme; followed by a keynote by Pamela McElwee | Professor of Human Ecology at Rutgers University

5th July 09:10 – 10:00 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Session 1

NbS: where are we now, where do we need to be?

5th July 10:30-12:00 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI) and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

We will acknowledge the achievements of recent times in raising the profile of nature in climate change and development policy, and highlight what has been achieved in many multilateral processes, not just in biodiversity and climate, but also in health and in the one-health agenda. We will clarify the current position of NbS in the three Rio conventions and the SDGs and will outline current criticisms and tensions which this conference will attempt to address, including greenwashing, disenfranchisement of local people, the commodification of nature, power dynamics in NbS narratives, finance, and how NbS are defined and implemented. We will dissect what happened at COP26, the G7 and what needs to happen by COP27, including why it matters to have NbS in the COP27 decision text and how we might get it there. The session might also discuss the consequences of NbS not appearing in the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.

Speakers

  • Josefina Brana | Vice President and Deputy Lead, Forests at World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) – Chair
  • Manuel Pulgar-Vidal | Global Leader of Climate & Energy, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
  • Vanessa Perez-Cirera | Chief Economist at the World Resources Institute (WRI)
  • Elizabeth Maruma Mrema | UN Assistant Secretary General & Executive Secretary, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity
  • Stewart Maginnis | Global Director of the NbS Programme at IUCN

 

Session 2

Defining NbS: solutions for whom, by whom, and for what?

5th July 13:30-15:30 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Rutgers University & IUCN

We will provide the social, scientific, political-economic context of NbS, including origins and evolving definitions. COP26 evidenced the need to better frame NbS in ways that are equitable, accessible, and gender-sensitive, by building on strong human rights principles and strengthening justice while safeguarding healthy ecosystems. We will discuss whether there is an emerging consensus, including the relationship to other important terms, in particular that of an “ecosystem-based approach”, a term preferred by the Convention on Biological Diversity. We will also discuss the role of afforestation and BECCs and ask under what circumstances do these biological approaches to sequestration “count” as NbS. This session will also explore the issue of nature-for-people vs nature-and-people; we will discuss concerns about the predominant way NbS is framed and communicated, which may not resonate with the diverse ways people interact with nature, and how to overcome them.

Speakers

  • Pam McElwee | Professor of Human Ecology at Rutgers University – Chair
  • Angela Andrade | Senior Climate Change and Biodiversity Policy Director, Conservation International – Colombia. Chair IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management
  • Marina Melanidis | Founder and Development Director of Youth4Nature

 

Session 3

NbS in Net-Zero: avoiding greenwashing & supporting sustainable development

5th July 16:00-18:00 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Oxford Net-Zero and the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

This session will start by reviewing the potential of NbS to support climate change mitigation, clarifying the scientific basis that NbS require fossil fuels to be kept in the ground. It will then directly address current criticisms that NbS are being used for greenwashing, including what the evidence for this is and how it is being done, as well as exploring how this can be avoided. Discussions will broach whether and how NbS can and should play a role in achieving net-zero and be used in offsetting schemes and, if so, how we ensure the price is high enough to avoid cascades of negative impacts on people, climate and nature. The discussion will also include the possibility of using net-zero momentum as a window of opportunity to scale up NbS projects, and discussion of insetting as an alternative to offsetting. We will ask how to ethically and sustainably bridge the divide between the public and private sectors on NbS and why we need to.

Speakers

  • Steve Smith | Executive Director, Oxford Net Zero and CO2RE – Chair
  • Cécile Girardin | Ecosystems Lab, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford
  • Pete Smith | Professor of Soils and Global Change, University of Aberdeen
  • Stephanie Roe | Global Climate Lead Scientist at WWF, Lead Author IPCC AR6 WGIII
  • Kaya Axelsson | Net Zero Policy Engagement Fellow at University of Oxford
  • Aline Soterroni | Research Fellow at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative and Oxford Net Zero

 

Keynote 2

Keynote 2: Gregorio Mirabal | Head of COICA; Atossa Soltani | Founder of Amazon Watch; Marc Palahi | Director of the European Forest Institute, Chair of the Circular Bio-economy Alliance

6th July 09:10 – 10:00 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Session 4

Critical role of Indigenous People and local communities in delivering successful NbS

6th July 10:30-12:30 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: International Institute for Environment & Development (IIED) and Forest Peoples Programme

Just and equitable NbS are designed, implemented, managed, and monitored by or in partnership with Indigenous peoples and/or local communities through a process that fully respects and champions local rights and knowledge, and generates local benefits. Evidence from science and practice have found these elements essential for the long-term effectiveness of NbS. However, there are serious concerns from IPLCs across the world that NbS is a top-down, externally-imposed concept that commodifies nature and brings serious risks to rights and livelihoods. In this session, we will explore the reasons for this, and address how to ensure that NbS are always driven by IPLCs or at least done in partnership with them with their active participation, including discussions around safeguards, governance models, and global standards, as well as what NbS means for different groups. We will consider the implications of tenure facility, rights and resources in NbS implementation, and how to take into account Forest-Carbon-Livelihoods and the social science of restoration networks. We will hear from community leaders from different regions, best-practice case studies, and from social scientists studying local impacts and governance of NbS.

Speakers

  • Dilys Roe | Principal researcher and team leader (biodiversity), International Institute for Environment and Development
  • Helen Tugendhat | Program Coordinator, Forest Peoples Program – Chair
  • Helen Magata | Communications Officer of Tebtebba
  • Musonda Kapena | Director at Namfumu Conservation Trust in Zambia
  • Yiching Song | Program Leader at Farmer Seed Network in China
  • Dismas Partalala Meitaya | Representative of the Ujaama Community Resources Trust in Tanzania
  • Diego Pacheco | Head of the Bolivian delegation to the UNFCCC at COP26
  • Marisol García | Kichwa youth leader from Peru

 

Session 5A

Understanding and ensuring positive outcomes for biodiversity and ecosystem health of NbS for climate change mitigation and adaptation

6th July 14:00-16:00Parallel – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: NbSI and UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC)

Nature-based solutions should by definition support biodiversity. However, not all projects badged as NbS have been shown to achieve this in practice. Badly designed projects might fail to deliver the intended benefits or could even harm biodiversity and compromise ecosystem integrity and resilience. There are some concerns that the use of ‘net gain’ for biodiversity in the IUCN standard risks use of biodiversity offsetting to meet this criterion. In this session, we will explore the ways in which research, practice and policy communities should work together to improve the design, monitoring and management of NbS so that they deliver clear benefits for biodiversity and ecosystem health alongside climate goals. We will present work on mapping and monitoring biodiversity and carbon at appropriate scales; measuring ecosystem health outcomes of NbS; priority restoration areas that can maximize biodiversity and climate goals; and building robust biodiversity-based metrics for channeling finance to good NbS projects.

Speakers

  • Valerie Kapos | Head of Nature-based Solutions at UNEP-WCMC – Chair
  • Robin Chazdon | Professor, Tropical Forest Restoration, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland
  • Ceilia Harvey | Ecosystem-based Adaptation Specialist at UN Environment Programme (UNEP)
  • Tom Finch | Conservation Scientist at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)
  • Lian Pin Koh | Chair Professor of Conservation, National University of Singapore

 

Session 5B

Governing NbS: Fostering inclusive and restorative land use governance

6th July 14:00-16:00Parallel – Oxford Martin School Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Environmental Change Institute Land-Use Group, University of Oxford

Across the world, land is being used, stewarded, and restored for food, energy, fiber, water, biodiversity, and more. The confluence of climate change, deforestation and land degradation has triggered calls for NbS, but also more socially and ecologically restorative land use governance. This panel will explore different perspectives on the meaning of inclusive and restorative governance in the context of NbS and land use change. Navigating social power relations and taking account of the global political economy requires consideration of who is empowered, to do what, through different approaches to governance; how governance shapes human relationships and motivations; and the underlying normative or ethical principles or assumptions behind different governance efforts. We will explore tensions between standardized systems of global remote monitoring, surveillance and control with demands for local empowerment and inclusion. We will consider how governing NbS can be strengthened by fostering more diverse and inclusive approaches, at multiple scales, to address deforestation and land use change.

Speakers

  • Mark Hirons | Research Fellow at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute – Chair
  • Mari Mulyani | Teaching Associate Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment – Online chair
  • Jasper Montana | Research Fellow in Human Geography from the University of Oxford – Online chair
  • Constance McDermott | Associate Professor at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute
  • Chairil Abdini | Secretary General of Indonesian Academy of Sciences
  • Eric Kumeh Mensah | Research Scientist at Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke)
  • Rachael Garrett | Assistant Professor of Environmental Policy at ETH Zurich

 

Session 6A

Understanding and overcoming obstacles – when do NbS not deliver for people, biodiversity, or climate and why?

6th July 16:30-18:30Parallel – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

COP26 revealed a disconnect between strong support for NbS in the international policy and business communities on the one hand, and on-the-ground perception of risk by Indigenous Peoples and local communities on the other. This played a role in the loss of the term “nature-based solutions” from the Glasgow Climate Pact. However, ensuring that the scale-up of NbS does not fail or become misused is essential. In this session, we will draw on rich embedded case studies to explore the basis of this resistance to NbS locally and how to bridge the divide to ensure international support translates into local benefits. We will explore when, why, and how interventions badged as NbS fail and how those failures should be addressed, as well as the exploring the distributional impacts of NbS. Talks include insights from  REDD(+), and learnings from the application of the IUCN Global Standard. Discussions will move beyond ‘good’ versus ‘bad’ case studies, recognizing complexities and balancing multiple goals.

Speakers

  • James Smith | Director, Natural Climate Solutions, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) – Chair
  • Giulia Carbone | Director, Natural Climate Solutions Alliance, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
  • Forrest Fleishmann | Associate professor in the Department of Forest Resources at the University of Minnesota
  • William Anderegg | Associate Professor, School Of Biological Sciences, University of Utah

 

 

Session 6B

Financing NbS: delivering money when and to where it matters

6th July 16:30-18:30Parallel – Oxford Martin School Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Oxford Sustainable Finance Group, Smith School, University of Oxford

This session will explore different approaches to ensuring different types of finance and financial services enable high-quality NbS projects around the world. We will explore current or potential bottlenecks constraining pipelines of bankable and investable projects and how to overcome them. Innovative and emerging NbS finance mechanisms will be showcased, especially those that seek to blend different funding and investment sources and forge new partnerships between public, private, and community stakeholders. The most effective and appropriate ways of building finance solutions will also be discussed, such as how to plan for and channel finance to empower local communities to deliver on their self-determined needs and priorities, particularly in the global south.

Speakers

  • Ben Caldecott | Director, Oxford Sustainable Finance Programme, & Associate Professor, Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment – Chair
  • Rhian-Mari Thomas | Chief Executive Officer at Green Finance Institute
  • Lorenzo Bernasconi  | Head of Climate and Environmental Solutions at Lombard Odier Investment Manager
  • Abyd Karmali | Managing Director, ESG & Sustainable Finance at Bank of America

 

Keynote 3

Keynote 3: Edward Barbier | University Distinguished Professor, Department of Economics, Colorado State University

7th July 09:10 – 10:00 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Session 7

The Economics of NbS: moving from evidence to decision making in policy, finance and infrastructure investments

7th July 10:30-12:30 – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: World Resources Institute (WRI) and the Smith School for Enterprise and Environment

Key barriers to effectively implementing, scaling up, and mainstreaming Nature-based Solutions (NbS) include a lack of knowledge of decision-makers of the true value of ecosystems, how these benefits are distributed, and/or their ability to be included in specific financial streams.  In this session, we will present some of the latest evidence on the extent to which NbS can deliver economic development through enhanced water security, food security, and climate adaptation, and provide expert insights into what works and what doesn’t for moving from economic evidence to action with public and private stakeholders. This session will begin with an overview of the key societal challenges that NbS economic valuation can address, and the key challenges and opportunities that economists face in motivating stakeholders to action for the decade ahead. Through three case studies from around the globe, we will then explore economic valuation and biophysical modeling approaches, equity and inclusivity considerations, and best practices and opportunities for scaling NbS interventions through partnerships, communications, financing, and policy solutions.

Speakers

  • Erin Gray | Senior Economist at the World Resources Institute (WRI) Economics Center – Chair
  • Florencia Zapata | Director of the Mountain Institute, Peru
  • Madhu Verma | Chief Economist, WRI India
  • Louise Stafford | Director Source Water Protection South Africa, The Nature Conservancy
  • Edward Barbier | Professor in the Department of Economics, Colorado State University

 

Session 8A

NbS for sustainable food production, water security and resilience

7th July 14:00-16:00Parallel – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenors: Environmental Change Institute, Smith School & The Nature Conservancy

Climate change, changing diets, and rapid urbanisation are threatening food and water security globally. There is an urgent need to transform land and water management practices on agricultural lands, while supporting ecosystem health and sustainable livelihoods. This session will strengthen the connection between NbS for water and food security, illustrating how NbS seek to enhance water storage, supply and quality to support agricultural production and livelihoods, including practices such as agroforestry and regenerative agriculture that can also enhance biodiversity. Case studies will feature lessons and strategies from implementation experience, drawing on successes and struggles, to identify emerging practices, enabling conditions, and pathways to scalable impacts across agricultural landscapes and value chains. In the lead up to the upcoming COP27 taking place in Egypt, there will be a particular focus on global experience across Africa, South Asia and Latin America.

Speakers

  • Dustin Garrick | Co-Director of the Smith School Water Programme, University of Oxford – Chair
  • Susan Chomba | Director of Vital Landscapes for Africa, World Resources Institute (WRI)
  • Mauricio Castro Schmitz | Regenerative Agriculture Director for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Latin America
  • Nandita Basu | Professor and University Research Chair, Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo
  • Sophie Tremolet | Water Security Director, Europe, The Nature Conservancy

 

Session 8B

Scaling up NbS in the UK – what is the role of Government in supporting practitioners?

7th July 14:00-16:00ParallelOxford Martin School Lecture Theatre

Institutional and private landowners and managers can make a major contribution – individually and collectively – to meeting the UK’s targets for net zero emissions, nature recovery and climate change adaptation through adopting low-carbon and nature-friendly land management practices. They are rising to this challenge against a backdrop of rising inflation and energy prices, labour shortages and international uncertainty, which are placing pressures on the whole economy, including land managers. This session will explore the practical steps the UK Government could take to facilitate this shift in line with its 2050 net zero target and forthcoming Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, including through the new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme in England, other targeted financial support, policy and regulation, and the role of private finance. It will also consider what landowners and land managers can do together in partnership – with or without Government support.

 

Speakers

  • Rosie Hails | Director of Science and Nature at the National Trust – Chair
  • Alexandre Chausson | Senior Researcher at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative
  • Alison Smith | Senior Research Associate at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute and the Nature-based Solutions Initiative
  • Kathryn Brown | Director of Climate Action at The Wildlife Trusts
  • Andrea Graham| Head of Policy Services at the National Farmers’ Union (NFU)
Session 9A

Business, Biodiversity and NbS

7th July 16:30-18:30Parallel – NHM Lecture Theatre

Convenor: Nature-based Insetting

New approaches are emerging to help companies make informed decisions on how they manage their impact on environment and society. For example, the task force for climate (TCFD), nature (TNFD), and inequality-related financial disclosures (TIFD) provide a risk management and disclosure framework for organisations to report and act on evolving nature-related risks. In this session, we will discuss the regulatory landscape emerging around business and biodiversity and whether the taskforces will shift successfully shift financial flows away from harmful outcomes. We will highlight the challenges of setting and meeting robust, ambitious, yet achievable, net-zero and nature-positive science-based targets and explore new approaches to reducing, offsetting and insetting impacts, including through the implementation of high-quality NbS.

Speakers

  • Cécile Girardin | Director of Nature-based Insetting and Technical Director at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI), University of Oxford – Chair
  • David Croft | Global Director Sustainability, Environment & Human Rights at Reckitt
  • Pedro Moura Costa | Director, BVRio Environmental Exchange
  • William Baldwin-Cantello | Director, Nature-based Solutions at World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF)-UK
  • Nikki Madras | Executive Director at Global Canopy
  • Stephanie Paquin-Jaloux | Director Biodiversity Compliance & Strategy at Firmenich
  • Alexia Kelly | Director, Net Zero + Nature at Netflix

 

Session 9B

Mainstreaming NbS for urban sustainability and climate change action

7th July 16:30-18:30ParallelOxford Martin School Lecture Theatre

Convenors: University of Durham, Naturvation

In this session we will introduce the role of urban NbS and give an overview of the latest global evidence of the potential of urban nature to contribute to climate change adaptation and mitigation, while reversing biodiversity loss. We will provide example cases of how cities are working with NbS to address climate change on the ground and will discuss the importance of community engagement, finance and governance arrangements for successful implementation. Moreover, we will reflect on the challenges of mainstreaming NbS into urban development and identify priorities for research and practice.

Speakers

  • Harriet Bulkeley | Professor of Geography, University of Durham and Coordinator at NATURVATION – Chair
  • Harriet Fink | Learning and Volunteering Programme Manager for the Natural History Museum’s Urban Nature Project and co-founder of Curiovan: Explorium of Natural Wonderment
  • Jessica Kavonic | Head of Implementation – Africa at C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group
  • Linjun Xie | Assistant Professor in Sustainable Urbanism, University of Nottingham Ningbo China
  • Rob Carr | Environmental Manager, Partnerships and Funding, UK Environment Agency
  • Clive Mitchell | Outcome Manager at NatureScot, Scottish Natural Heritage
  • Elana Badar | Representative from NatureScot, Scottish Natural Heritage

 

Speakers

Below is a list of confirmed speakers to date. Many more speakers to be added soon.

  • Chairil Abdin | Secretary General of Indonesian Academy of Sciences
  • Inger Andersen | Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme
  • William Anderegg | Associate Professor, School Of Biological Sciences, University of Utah
  • Angela Andrade | Senior Climate Change and Biodiversity Policy Director, Conservation International - Colombia. Chair IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management
  • Kaya Axelsson | Net Zero Policy Engagement Fellow at University of Oxford
  • Elana Badar | Representative from NatureScot, Scottish Natural Heritage
  • William Baldwin-Cantello | Director, Nature-based Solutions at World Wide Fund For Nature-UK
  • Edward Barbier | University Distinguished Professor, Department of Economics, Colorado State University
  • Nandita Basu | Professor and University Research Chair, Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo
  • Lorenzo Bernascon | Head of Climate and Environmental Solutions at Lombard Odier Investment Managers
  • Josefina Brana | Vice President and Deputy Lead, Forests at World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
  • Kathryn Brown | Director of Climate Action at The Wildlife Trusts
  • Harriet Bulkeley | Professor of Geography, University of Durham and Coordinator at NATURVATION
  • Ben Caldecott | Director, Oxford Sustainable Finance Programme, & Associate Professor, Smith School for Enterprise and the Environment
  • Mauricio Castro Schmitz | Regenerative Agriculture Director for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Latin America
  • Giulia Carbone | Director, Natural Climate Solutions Alliance, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
  • Rob Carr | Environmental Manager, Partnerships and Funding, UK Environment Agency
  • Alexandre Chausson | Senior Researcher at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative
  • Robin Chazdon | Professor, Tropical Forest Restoration, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland
  • Susan Chomba | Director of Vital Landscapes for Africa, World Resources Institute (WRI)
  • David Coomes | Professor of Forest Ecology and Conservation, University of Cambridge
  • David Croft | Global Director Sustainability, Environment & Human Rights at Reckitt
  • Tom Finch | Conservation Scientist at the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB)
  • Harriet Fink | Learning and Volunteering Programme Manager for the Natural History Museum’s Urban Nature Project and co-founder of Curiovan: Explorium of Natural Wonderment
  • Forrest Fleischman | Associate professor in the Department of Forest Resources at the University of Minnesota
  • Marisol Garcia | Kichwa youth leader from Peru
  • Rachael Garrett | Assistant Professor of Environmental Policy at ETH Zurich
  • Dustin Garrick | Co-Director of the Smith School Water Programme, University of Oxford
  • Cécile Girardin | Director of Nature-based Insetting and Technical Director at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI), University of Oxford
  • Erin Gray | Senior Economist at the World Resources Institute (WRI) Economics Center
  • Andrea Graham | Head of Policy Services at the National Farmers' Union
  • Rosie Hails | Director of Science and Nature at the National Trust
  • Ceilia Harvey | Ecosystem-based Adaptation Specialist at UN Environment Programme
  • Mark Hirons | Research Fellow at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute
  • Thomas Iseman | Director of Water Scarcity and Markets for the Global Freshwater Program of The Nature Conservancy
  • Musonda Kapena | Director at Namfumu Conservation Trust in Zambia
  • Valerie Kapos | Head of Nature-based Solutions at UNEP-WCMC
  • Jessica Kavonic | Head of Implementation - Africa at C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group
  • Abyd Karmali | Managing Director, ESG & Sustainable Finance at Bank of America
  • Alexia Kelly | Director, Net Zero + Nature at Netflix
  • Eric Kumeh Mensah | Research Scientist at Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke)
  • Helen Magata | Communications Officer of Tebtebba
  • Stewart Maginnis | Global Director of the NbS Programme at IUCN
  • Niki Mardas | Executive Director at Global Canopy
  • Elizabeth Maruma Mrema | UN Assistant Secretary General & Executive Secretary, Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity
  • Constance McDermott | Associate Professor at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute
  • Pam McElwee | Professor of Human Ecology at Rutgers University
  • Marina Melanidis | Founder and Development Director at Youth4Nature
  • Clive Mitchell | Outcome Manager at NatureScot, Scottish Natural Heritage
  • Gregorio Mirabal | General Coordinator of the Congress of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin (COICA)
  • Jasper Montana | Research Fellow in Human Geography from the University of Oxford
  • Pedro Moura Costa | Director, BVRio Environmental Exchange
  • Mari Mulyani | Teaching Associate Oxford's School of Geography and the Environment
  • Michael Obersteiner | Director of the Environmental Change Institute, Oxford University
  • Diego Pacheco | Head of the Bolivian delegation to the UNFCCC at COP26
  • Marc Palahi | Director of the European Forest Institute
  • Stephanie Paquin-Jaloux | Director Biodiversity Compliance & Strategy at Firmenich
  • Dismas Partalala Meitaya | Representative of the Ujaama Community Resources Trust in Tanzania
  • Lian Pin Koh | Chair Professor of Conservation, National University of Singapore
  • Manuel Pulgar-Vidal | Global Leader of Climate & Energy, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
  • Yiching Song | Program Leader at Farmer Seed Network in China
  • Vanessa Perez-Cirera | Chief Economist at the World Resources Institute (WRI)
  • Dilys Roe | Principal researcher and team leader (biodiversity), International Institute for Environment and Development
  • Stephanie Roe | Global Climate Lead Scientist at WWF, Lead Author IPCC AR6 WGIII
  • Nathalie Seddon | Professor of Biodiversity, Director of the NbSI, University of Oxford
  • Alison Smith | Senior Research Associate at the Oxford Environmental Change Institute and the Nature-based Solutions Initiative
  • James Smith | Director, Natural Climate Solutions, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
  • Pete Smith | Professor of Soils and Global Change, University of Aberdeen
  • Steve Smith | Executive Director, Oxford Net Zero and CO2RE
  • Atossa Soltani | Founder and President of Amazon Watch
  • Aline Soterroni | Research Fellow at the Nature-based Solutions Initiative and Oxford Net Zero
  • Louise Stafford | Director Source Water Protection South Africa, The Nature Conservancy
  • Rhian-Mari Thomas | Chief Executive Officer at Green Finance Institute
  • Sophie Tremolet | Water Security Director, Europe, The Nature Conservancy
  • Helen Tugendhat | Program Coordinator, Forest Peoples Program
  • Madhu Verma | Chief Economist, WRI India
  • Linjun Xie | Assistant Professor in Sustainable Urbanism, University of Nottingham Ningbo China
  • Florencia Zapata | Director of the Mountain Institute, Peru